KonMari Newsletter: Embracing the Time Being

It’s precisely because we are all so intimately interconnected that we can create collective change by changing ourselves. Marie talks about how, by tidying your own room, you will set off a chain reaction, and others in your house will begin to tidy, too. This is true for other qualities, like kindness and compassion and environmental awareness. We clean up our own act first. We do our best to inspire—quietly, patiently, and by example—knowing that we will keep trying no matter what.
— Ruth Ozeki

The Washington Post Podcast: Other: Mixed Race in America

The privacy that reading fiction gave me, that sense of solitude [while] also being in company [of] another mind was...very important to me, and very precious. From a very early age, I wanted to do that. I wanted to make that same kind of magic happen.
— Ruth Ozeki

May 5, 2017
The Washington Post, Alexandra Laughlin
How Ruth Ozeki Renamed Herself
Other: Mixed Race in America Podcast

LIT HUB: RED INK SERIES PANEL DISCUSSION ON WRITING THE BODY

We’re blessed with these imaginations and empathy is not something passive. It’s active. It’s something that we can do both as writers and as readers.
— Ruth Ozeki

December 6, 2016
Literary Hub
Writing the Body: Trauma, Illness, Sexuality and Beyond
Red Ink Reading Series with Ruth Ozeki, Eileen Myles, Porochista Khakpour, Anna March, and Alexandra Kleeman, hosted by Michele Filgate

LA REVIEW OF BOOKS: RUTH OZEKI IN CONVERSATION WITH DAVID PALUMBO-LIU, "I DON'T SEE A WAY OF SEPARATING COMEDY AND TRAGEDY."

I don’t see a way of separating comedy from tragedy. They are, as the ancients knew, two faces of the same coin. I was really happy when Jane Smiley, in a review for the Chicago Tribune, described [my work as] “comical-satirical-farcical-epical-tragical-romantical.” That pretty much describes everything you need to know about my aspirations as a novelist!
— Ruth Ozeki

September 16, 2014
Los Angeles Review of Books
Where We Are for the Time Being with Ruth Ozeki
David Palumbo-Liu

THE DISH: THE BUDDHIST AS NOVELIST

A Tale for the Time Being plays with this notion of self or selves, which in Buddhism is called no-self, or anatman. Buddhism teaches that because everything is impermanent, there is no fixed self that remains unchanged in time. And Buddhism also teaches that there is not an independent self, that can exist separate from others. Thich Nhat Hanh calls this interbeing. So what we experience as the self is more like a collection of fluid, interpenetrating, interdependencies that change and flow through time.
— Ruth Ozeki

September 21, 2014
This Dish
The Buddhist as Novelist
Andrew Sullivan

BUSTLE: Ruth Ozeki On 'A Tale For The Time Being': We All Have A Buddhist Nun Inside Us

I like to think we all have our own inner Jikos, the archetypal character who serves as a moral compass. She’s very much a part of our folklore — both our public folklore and our inner folklore. So I think that’s why people like her: they recognize her, because we all have one.
— Ruth Ozeki

St Louis Post-Dispatch: Readable and funny, Ruth Ozeki's novel meditates on time

I am really interested in the way we relate to time,” she says by phone from New York. “In particular, the way readers and writers talk to each other. Casting your voice out into the future is very beautiful to me.
— Ruth Ozeki

January 09, 2014
St Louis Post-Dispatch
Readable and funny, Ruth Ozeki's novel meditates on time
Jane Henderson