The Guardian: Ruth Ozeki beats Thomas Pynchon to top Kitschie award

Ozeki won the Kitschies Red Tentacle prize on Wednesday night for her story weaving together the lives of a schoolgirl, a writer, and a zen-anarchist nun. The prize is for novels containing "elements of the speculative and fantastic", with Ozeki seeing off competition from Thomas Pynchon, Anne Carson, Patrick Ness and James Smythe to win.

See also: RED TENTACLE!

February 13, 2014
Ruth Ozeki beats Thomas Pynchon to top Kitschie award
The Guardian
February 13, 2014

 

Critical Mass: NBCC Fiction Finalist Ruth Ozeki in Conversation with MFA Student Mallory McMahon

Thanks to The School of Writing at The New School, as well as the tireless efforts of their students and faculty, we are able to provide interviews with each of the NBCC Awards Finalists for the publishing year 2013. …

Here, NBCC Fiction Finalist Ruth Ozeki talks with MFA Student Mallory McMahon. See the School of Writing page for more.

February 12, 2014
NBCC Fiction Finalist Ruth Ozeki in Conversation with MFA Student Mallory McMahon
Critical Mass, National Book Critics Circle blog
Mallory McMahon

NBCC: 30 Books: Mark Athitakis on Ruth Ozeki’s “A Tale for the Time Being”

This magical yet earthbound novel reveals and exemplifies the freedom you gain when you’re willing to rethink what “connection” means, and consider that it’s a different thing in every living moment.
— Mark Athitakis, Critical Mass, National Book Critics Circle blog

January 28, 2014
Critical Mass,National Book Critics Circle blog
30 Books: Mark Athitakis on Ruth Ozeki’s “A Tale for the Time Being”
Mark Athitakis

 

BUSTLE: Ruth Ozeki On 'A Tale For The Time Being': We All Have A Buddhist Nun Inside Us

I like to think we all have our own inner Jikos, the archetypal character who serves as a moral compass. She’s very much a part of our folklore — both our public folklore and our inner folklore. So I think that’s why people like her: they recognize her, because we all have one.
— Ruth Ozeki

St Louis Post-Dispatch: Readable and funny, Ruth Ozeki's novel meditates on time

I am really interested in the way we relate to time,” she says by phone from New York. “In particular, the way readers and writers talk to each other. Casting your voice out into the future is very beautiful to me.
— Ruth Ozeki

January 09, 2014
St Louis Post-Dispatch
Readable and funny, Ruth Ozeki's novel meditates on time
Jane Henderson 

Star Tribune: Interview with Ruth Ozeki

It’s a small but spacious room in my mind, very quiet and far away, and often difficult to get to. There are certain keys that fit the many doorways between here and there, but I’m often unsure of which keys to use, and I often lose or misplace them. But once I’m inside the room, I feel like I’ve come home.
— Ruth Ozeki

January 8, 2014
Star Tribune
Interview with Ruth Ozeki
Laurie Hertzel

Public Libraries Online: The Shores of My Imagination

With Nao’s diary, I didn’t actually take a walk on the beach and stumble across a plastic bag containing a Hello Kitty lunchbox with a diary inside it. On the other hand, I was probably walking along the beach when I started to hear the voice of this young girl speaking in the back of my mind. So in a way, her voice washed up on the shores of my imagination.
— Ruth Ozeki

January 8, 2014
Public Libraries Online
The Shores of My Imagination: A Conversation with Ruth Ozeki
Brendan Dowling

Salon: A powerful, beautiful book

Ozeki is one of the smartest (and funniest) writers I know, and in this novel she flat-out knocks it out of the park. “A Tale for the Time Being” is as layered and mysterious as life and it’s overwhelmingly wise, reaching across lands and language and time to show the unity, solitude, confusion and hope at the heart of the human experience. A powerful, beautiful book.
— Junot Díaz, Salon

December 26, 2013
Salon
Salon’s Ultimate Book Guide For 2013
Michele Filgate